Quality Writing Lessons: Everyday writing tips for college and high school students.

Hamlet: Passion Versus Reason

Shakespeare uses his characters to bring out his teaching. He has used Hamlet in various scenes to show how passion and reason differ in making decisions. Shakespeare has succeeded in making his characters and bringing out his mind and teachings through them. Using Hamlet, Shakespeare emphasizes the main differences between passion and reason. He shows how the two are critical when it comes to making decisions. He concentrates on both ends and the circumstances that arise because reason and passion. He makes the message clear why it is important to think of the two in life. Both have the negative and positive sides. From the message, it is evident that one needs to question the two before making any decision. You have to ask what is important and what will be the probable results.

Supernatural Ghost Scene

When Shakespeare introduces the ghost as a supernatural being in the story, he wants to teach how we get deceived by both passion and reason. As the reader, we have to choose what to believe. This, however, should be guided by skeptical thinking. We should not just accept and believe that there is a ghost. Worse still, Hamlet has his mind made up. He wants to kill and avenge his father. His passion is to kill and avenge his dad. What reason does he have to kill? This brings in the question of negative and positive results. If you gauge the two, then you will be free from the wagon of passion. However, it does not mean that the side that has reasons is always the correct. In the end, you will have either a positive or negative results. You have to choose what you can live with. The reason he wants to murder is anger. But should this be a good reason to base your decision on. The ghost which we are not sure if it’s real or not has come over Hamlet and is in full command of his decisions. We have to ask ourselves if we believe in supernatural powers. In this case the ghost.

Rational behavior

On the day that Hamlet plots to kill, he procrastinates. He is tempted to rational thinking of whether to kill the ghost. He is worried if the ghosts damn or not. HE intends to hold a party so as to think through his intentions. After carefully thinking through his intentions, he concludes that the ghost was lying. This does not leave him with any reason to kill.