Quality Writing Lessons: Everyday writing tips for college and high school students.

Vital Advice On How To Use A Sample Of An Argumentative Essay

Why to Look to Sample Argumentative Essays for Learning and Writing Tools

Samples can be a great learning and writing tool that can help to motivate and help you write an argumentative paper—or any type of essay. Samples can show you how a really well written argumentative essay looks, is structured, and can teach you how a thesis statement is written and how to persuade your audience through effective argumentative techniques. In regards to structure, sample essays can show you where the thesis statement should be placed in your argumentative essay, and how the essay should flow from introduction to close. Also, all argumentative essays must acknowledge and refute the opposition in some way, and you can learn how to do this through reading essays that acknowledge and debunk the opposition’s arguments effectively.

Using Samples Without Plagiarizing

You want to be careful, when reading sample essays of any kind, not to borrow specific or closely stated phrasing from the author. Why? Today’s plagiarism checkers will spot any phrasing too close to the original, and you will be accused of plagiarism and could possibly be given an F, a 0, or even suspended from school, if the offense is obvious and clearly an act of unethical academic dishonesty. So be careful to read the sample for structure and learning only – then put it face down, and move on to your own writing or reading of a different sample.

Using Sample Argumentative Essays Effectively

Sample essays can be used really effectively if you print out the essay and use a pen or highlighter to label where parts of the essay occur. You will generally find the thesis statement at the end of paragraph one after some introductory sentences or at the end of paragraph two, if it took the author almost two full paragraphs to work up to the thesis.

Using Sample Essays for Thesis and Other Essay Element Help

The thesis statement will either be an “I” or third person statement, typically, which states very clearly what the author is arguing. For example, the author might say, “In short, I believe we should support both eating and farming organically, despite the higher cost, in order to ensure the longevity of our planet and mankind.” That is an effective thesis statement—and all argumentative essays need these to keep them on track. Also, look for topic sentences that support this thesis and how the author acknowledges arguments against their own and then refutes them through sound reasoning.